General

3:30

Keeping horses in show-ready condition requires time, effort and commitment. For competitive horses, matching their feed program to the type of exercise they are doing helps ensure their workouts are appropriately fueled.

In this video, Dr. Mary Beth Gordon explains how to support different types of exercise through nutrition, including:
- Aerobic activities like dressage, reining and endurance riding, which rely on fats and fibers.
- Anaerobic work, such as racing, cutting or 3-day eventing, which benefit more from soluble carbohydrates than fats.
- Supporting muscle recovery and maintaining weight, which are key for performance horses during the rigors of competition and training.

0:55 – How to feed horses who perform anaerobic exercise
1:27 – How to feed horses who perform anaerobic exercise
1:56 – Supporting muscle recovery and performance
2:20 – Maintaining weight through competition and training

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Purina Animal Nutrition is a leader in equine research and feed development. Our feed is formulated for horses of all life

9:26

http://www.thinklikeahorse.org/

Here is talk about the horse's digestive system and why I feed horses even if they are in pasture. I talk about when horses have a choice about what to eat, they normally do NOT eat bad food. However, when a horse is locked in a stall and is unnaturally staved all day and only thrown a flake a hay once or twice a day, their hunger over rides the instinct to NOT eat bad food, so they eat mold or mice or dead birds in the hay and that is one reasons horses colic - lots of other reason like lack of clean water, not being able to graze and eat all day like they are designed to do, feeding only dry tightly pack hay so they eat clumps and do not chew slowly and let their system work the way it is designed to work.

FACT: A horse's stomach does NOT stretch like a human stomach, so when a horse eats FAST and fills the stomach very quickly, the stomach forces undigested food into the system before it is ready, another issue that contributes to colic. When a horse is starved and not feed all day, the

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